People

Sara Adar

Sara Adar

Co-investigator

About Sara

Sara Adar is an Associate Professor and Associate Chair of Epidemiology at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Sara has nearly 20 years of experience researching the human health effects of environmental exposures, especially air pollution and noise. She has an active research portfolio within the United States, Asia, Europe, and South America that is supported by funding by the NIEHS, NIA, CDC, and Health Effects Institute. Sara is the Director of the PhD program, an Associate Editor at the Environmental Health Perspectives, a member of the Review Committee for the Health Effects Institute, and the former Secretary/Treasurer of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology. When not at work, Sara enjoys hiking, puzzles, and spending time with her kids.

Amy Kate Bailey

Amy Kate Bailey

Co-investigator

About Amy

Amy Kate Bailey’s main area of research focuses on historical racist violence in the United States. This scholarship has focused on factors that predict the intensity of mob violence, the characteristics of its victims, and contemporary consequences. Her current project examines the link between communities’ past experiences with collective violence and rates of infant mortality and other adverse pregnancy outcomes today.

Amy is an Associate Professor of Sociology and Institute for Health Research and Policy fellow at the University of Illinois Chicago, and a research affiliate at the University of Washington’s Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology.  She was previously on faculty at Utah State University, and completed a postdoc at Princeton University’s Office of Population Research. Prof. Bailey earned her PhD and MA in Sociology from the University of Washington. Her work has been published in the American Journal of SociologyAmerican Sociological Review, and Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences, among other outlets.

Kelly Bakulski

Kelly Bakulski

Co-investigator

About Kelly

Kelly Bakulski, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Michigan School of Public Health and the Data Management and Statistical Core Leader for the Michigan Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center. She is a molecular epidemiologist and an environmental health scientist.

Dr. Bakulski’s research team goal is to understand the environmental chemical and genetic etiologies of neurological disorders. She has particular expertise in life course heavy metals exposure testing with dementia and in analyses across multiple levels of the genome, including the epigenome and the transcriptome. Dr. Bakulski’s research incorporates population approaches and laboratory experiments to develop biomarker and cell type tools informing molecular epidemiology inferences.

Philippa Clarke

Philippa Clarke

Co-investigator

About Philippa

Philippa Clarke received her Ph.D. in Epidemiology/Social Science and Health from the University of Toronto in 2000. Her research interests are in social epidemiology, social gerontology, life course perspectives, models of disability, and population health. She is primarily interested in the social determinants of health at both the micro and macro levels of social reality and at the intersection of these levels as well.

Her current work examines the role of the built environment on mobility disability, cognitive function, and social participation (with data from the Chicago Community Adult Health Survey); the effect of the urban environment on disability trajectories over time (with national data from the Americans’ Changing Lives Study); the health and social factors influencing the use of assistive devices (with data from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging); and cross-national disparities in disability and psychosocial resources (comparing data from the US Health and Retirement Study and the English Longitudinal Study on Ageing). She is currently funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) through a career development (K01) award to use geographic information systems (GIS) to examine the relationship between the built environment and disability progression, and to identify whether older adults living in less accessible neighborhoods are more likely to be admitted to a nursing home over time.

David Cunningham

David Cunningham

Co-investigator

About David

David Cunningham is Professor and Chair of Sociology at Washington University in St. Louis. His research examines the causes and consequences of racial conflict, with an emphasis on the historical and contemporary mobilization of white supremacist action. An instructor and Executive Board member for Washington University’s Prison Education Project, he has received multiple awards for teaching and mentorship, as well as the American Sociological Association’s 2019 Robin M. Williams Award for Distinguished Contributions to Scholarship, Teaching, and Service. With Hedwig Lee and Geoff Ward, he recently edited “Legacies of Racial Violence: Clarifying and Addressing the Presence of the Past,” a special issue of The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science.
Amanda Donovan

Amanda Donovan

Staff

About Amanda

Amanda Donovan is a project coordinator for the Social Environment and Health Program, where she assists with post-award project management, financial documentation, social media, and websites. She received her BA in Russian Language and Literature from Michigan State University in 2008.
John Dou

John Dou

Data Analyst

About John

John Dou is a research analyst in the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. He is part of the Bakulski research team, which studies the environmental and genetic risk factors of neurological disorders. His work examines multiple levels of omics data, including genetic, epigenetic, and gene transcription with exposure windows including the prenatal period.
Michelle Downer

Michelle Downer

Staff

About Michelle

Michelle Downer is the administrative assistant for the Social and Environmental Health program. She has her Associates in Applied Science and is currently working toward her Bachelors in Psychology through the University of Michigan. Michelle spends most of her time with her husband and son, she enjoys boating in the summer and reading & staying warm in the winter.
Jennifer D'Souza

Jennifer D'Souza

Data Analyst

About Jennifer

Jennifer D’Souza has been working as a data manager and research analyst with the Adar research group since 2012. She grew up in the Northeast and came to Ann Arbor for college, where she’s remained ever since – earning a BA, MPH and PhD all from the University of Michigan. She started out interested in medicine, but realized that her true calling was public health. Following graduate school, she worked in aging research before moving to her current position with the Adar group, where she feels lucky to be able to do data analysis to address important public health issues. Outside of “work”, she enjoys spending time with her husband and their 3 sons, staying active, and checking out the downtown Ann Arbor scene!

Michael Elliott

Michael Elliott

Co-investigator

About Michael

Michael Elliott is a Professor of Biostatistics at the University of Michigan School of Public Health and Research Scientist at the Institute for Social Research. He received his PhD in biostatistics in 1999 from the University of Michigan. Prior to joining the University of Michigan in 2005, he held an appointment as an Assistant Professor at the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and prior to that as a Visiting Professor of Biostatistics at the University of Michigan School of Public Health and as a Visiting Research Scientist at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute. Dr. Elliott’s statistical research interests focus around the broad topic of “missing data,” including the design and analysis of sample surveys, casual and counterfactual inference, and latent variable models. He has worked closely with collaborators in injury research, pediatrics, women’s health, the social determinants of physical and mental health, and smoking cessation research. Dr. Elliott has served as an Associate Editor for the Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series C and the Journal of the American Statistical Association, and as an Associate Editor and Editor of the Journal of Survey Statistics and Methodology. He was Associate Chair of Academic Affairs for the Department from 2018-2021.
Mike Esposito

Mike Esposito

Co-investigator

About Mike

Mike Esposito’s research focuses on understanding the production of racialized disparities in population health.

Dr. Esposito investigates how broad, racialized social systems – and their constituent institutions – are configured in ways that layer privileges on white populations and hazards on BIPOC populations. His research ultimately seeks to understand how these systematically-distributed privileges and penalties arrive on population health.

This work includes studies that examine how the actions of race-cognizant institutions (e.g., law enforcement agencies) contribute to health disparities; research that considers how multiple racialized systems overlap to gate access to generative health contexts; and, projects which demonstrate how structural racism enters and distorts social processes that are foundational to well-being (e.g., the association among education and health).

Dr. Esposito uses contemporary statistical methods – Bayesian and counterfactual-based mediation approaches at the moment – across his work. Esposito’s research has appeared in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences; American Journal of Sociology; American Journal of Public Health and more.

Jessica Faul

Jessica Faul

Co-investigator

About Jessica

Jessica Faul received a BA in Japanese Language and Literature from the University of Michigan before returning to earn her Masters of Public Health and PhD in Epidemiology from the School of Public Health. She is a Research Associate Professor in the Survey Research Center, Co-Investigator of the Health and Retirement Study, and Co-Director of the ISR Biospecimen Lab. She is affiliated with the BioSocial Methods Collaborative, the Population Studies Center, and the Michigan Center on the Demography of Aging. Dr. Faul’s work focuses on socioeconomic predictors of health and health disparities across the life course. Her research integrates biological, genetic, and social science data and uses longitudinal modeling and time-varying predictors in examining determinants of health. She is currently leading a grant to identify gene-by-environment interactions and their influence on later life cognitive decline in the Health and Retirement Study and other cohort studies of older adults. She also leads a project to elucidate the biological pathways and networks through which life course social disadvantage influences subsequent morbidity and mortality. This work investigates how factors like DNA methylation, gene expression, and mitochondrial exhaustion interact with social factors like socioeconomic status, psychosocial stressors, and neighborhood context to together influence age-related health conditions. She has also led the development of a series of workshops to train social scientists on the use of genomic data. As the Co-Director of the ISR Biospecimen Lab, Dr. Faul routinely advises on and designs biological data collection protocols for other large-scale population-based studies to help ensure high quality and valid assessment of biological data collected in the field.
Kayla Fike

Kayla Fike

Post Doc

About Kayla

Kayla Fike received her Ph.D. in Psychology and Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Michigan and is an incoming Assistant Professor in Human and Organizational Development at Vanderbilt University. She examines how young Black and Brown people navigate and respond to legacies of racialized and classed inequity in urban communities, such as community violence, racial discrimination, and public disinvestment in neighborhoods. Her research program highlights ways that young people of color navigate interpersonal and systemic manifestations of discrimination and rely on their resources and skills to come to thrive. In her newest line of research, she examines potential contributing factors to urban-residing young Black adults’ ratings of the quality of their neighborhoods with specific attention to the role of gender. She is committed to breaking down the divide between academia and minoritized communities by developing community-university partnerships and using participatory action methodology in the future. Last but certainly not least, she is a proud Michigan native, born and raised in Detroit and Pontiac, Michigan.

Caislin Firth

Caislin Firth

Investigator

About Caislin

Caislin Firth, PhD, MPH is a Research Scientist at the Addictions, Drug & Alcohol Institute (ADAI) at the University of Washington (UW).

Caislin is a social epidemiologist interested in unpacking how public policies shape social and built environments and their influence on health inequities. This pursuit requires interdisciplinary research methods that prioritize community engagement and intersectoral collaborations, given that the mechanisms of change (policy, zoning, infrastructure) often lie outside the purview of public health and academia. With a background working in local government in the Pacific Northwest, Caislin’s research goes beyond answering the questions “do population health interventions (e.g. cannabis legalization) improve health?” by also considering what works, for whom, and in which contexts. In practice, Caislin has studied the underlying causes of inequities in substance use, criminal justice, mobility, and transportation outcomes and the relationships between neighborhood environments and health.

Victoria Fisher

Victoria Fisher

Graduate Student

About Victoria

Victoria is a master’s student in the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health. Pursuing a degree in epidemiology and public health genetics, she is interested in the relationship between the built environment, structural racism, and epigenetics. Victoria is also the communications manager for the Center for Social Solutions, a racial and social justice research center in the University’s College of Literature, Sciences and the Arts. Prior to entering the public health sphere, she studied contact linguistics where she was introduced to the complex overlap between geopolitics, sociolinguistics, and health outcomes. Upon completing her MPH, Victoria hopes to undertake a PhD in medical anthropology or environmental health with a focus on the development of cities, intersecting cultures, and health.

Jiaqi Gao

Jiaqi Gao

Graduate Student

About Jiaqi

Jiaqi Gao is a first-year Ph.D. student in the department of epidemiology. She received her MPH in epidemiology degree at the University of Michigan, School of Public Health. Her primary research interests lie in exploring the risk factor of environmental air pollution on various outcomes.

Nebiyat Girma

Nebiyat Girma

Graduate Student

About Nebiyat

Nebiyat Girma is a research analyst in the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. She is part of the Bakulski research team, and her work examines chronic conditions, epigenetic aging and DNA methylation. Nebiyat holds an MPH and certificates in Social Epidemiology and Injury Science from the University of Michigan.

Iris Gomez-Lopez

Iris Gomez-Lopez

Data Scientist

About Iris

Iris Gomez-Lopez joined SRC-Social Environment and Health as a Geoinformatics Data Analyst in 2018. Iris has a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of North Texas. Her work in Computational Epidemiology integrates disciplines such as Geoinformatics, Data Mining, Natural Language Processing, Data Analytics, and Modelling. She held a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Michigan School of Information, working with the Neighborhood Effects research group. She contributed to creating the National Neighborhood Data Archive (NaNDA) hosted at the University of Michigan. And currently, she is working on multiple SEH projects that aim to study the relationship between ways of historical institutional racism and various health outcomes such as cognitive decline, chronic diseases, and epigenomic patterns.
Solome Haile

Solome Haile

Data Analyst

About Solome

Solome Haile is an emerging scholar and researcher. Her work ranges from environmental racism and environmental justice to the collateral consequences of incarceration. Her research interests include social theory, carcerality, environmental racism, and qualitative methodologies. Currently, she serves as a research associate in the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research’s Landscapes research team and a research assistant in Washington University in St. Louis’s Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity and Equity, as she prepares to begin a PhD program in Sociology.
Margaret T. Hicken

Margaret T. Hicken

Principal Investigator

About Margaret

Through her entire research program, Margaret Hicken is committed to clarifying the social causes and biological mechanisms linking racial group membership to renal and cardiovascular disease inequalities. The major hallmark of Hicken’s research is the integration of scientific knowledge from diverse disciplines, as this transdisciplinary approach to research allows for creative and innovative insights into the root causes and mechanisms of the seemingly intractable racial health inequalities. A significant portion of her research program falls at the intersection of sociology, geography, and environmental toxicology, examining the interrelated roles of racial residential segregation, neighborhood disadvantage, environmental hazards, and racial health inequalities.
Cesar Higgins

Cesar Higgins

Graduate Student

About Cesar

Cesar Higgins’ research interests vary from mental health research on sexual minorities to intersectional research on disability and health. Methodologically, he is interested in using statistical methods to test epidemiological theories. In addition, he has been interested in the implementation of time series analysis to better understand populations’ health dynamics. More recently, he has expanded his interest into Bayesian modeling and, missing data, and data simulation.

Sharon Kardia

Sharon Kardia

Co-investigator

About Sharon

Sharon Kardia’s main research interests are in the genetic epidemiology of common chronic diseases and their risk factors. She is particularly interested in gene-environment and gene-gene interactions and in developing novel analytical strategies to understand the complex relationship between genetic variation, environmental variation, and risk of common chronic diseases. Her research utilizes genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic measures on large epidemiological cohorts.

Hedy Lee

Hedy Lee

Co-investigator

About Hedy

Hedwig (Hedy) Lee is broadly interested in the social determinants and consequences of population health and health disparities, with a particular focus on race/ethnicity, poverty, race-related stress, and the family.

Hedy received her PhD in Sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2009. After receiving her PhD, she was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar at the University of Michigan from 2009 to 2011. She holds a courtesy joint appointment at the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at WUSTL and is a Faculty Affiliate in the Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. She is also an Associate Director of the Center for Race, Ethnicity & Equity. She currently serves on the research advisory board for the Vera Institute of Justice and the board for the Interdisciplinary Association for Population Health Science. She is also a member of The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Committee on Population. Her recent work examines the impact of structurally rooted chronic stressors, such as mass incarceration, on health and health disparities.

Ember McCoy

Ember McCoy

Graduate Student

About Ember

Ember McCoy is a PhD student in the University of Michigan’s School for Environment and Sustainability (SEAS) studying the politics of air pollution monitoring and regulation. She is using a mixed-methods approach to study how and why current US standards fall short in protecting human health in communities facing disparate air pollution burdens, particularly communities of color and low-income. Ember comes from a professional background in community organizing, lobbying, and program development around energy and diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice. She is particularly passionate about community-engaged research, scholar activism, and inclusive teaching. Outside of academia, she puts her passions & skills to practice through climate, housing, and labor organizing with the University of Michigan’s Graduate Student Union (GEO 3550) and service on the Ann Arbor Energy Commission.

In the Landscapes of Structural Racism and Health lab, Ember is creating and mapping U.S. segregation measures using ArcGIS Pro and R along with other spatial analysis needs.

Helen C. S. Meier

Helen C. S. Meier

Co-investigator

About Helen

Helen Meier is an Assistant Research Scientist in the Population, Neurodevelopment, and Genetics Program at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research. Broadly, her research examines how social vulnerabilities become biological vulnerabilities resulting in health disparities. She is an epidemiologist and uses a life course framework to understand the molecular pathways by which social and environmental exposures occurring throughout life get “under the skin” to affect adult and later life health. Dr. Meier is specifically interested in the biology of immune aging and immunological dysfunction as key factors in the aging process. Dr. Meier investigates health and health inequities using a multi-level biosocial approach ranging from biomarkers to structural drivers.

Lewis Miles

Lewis Miles

Graduate Student

About Lewis

Lewis Miles is sociology Ph.D. candidate who uses interdisciplinary approaches in the study of Black life from cradle to grave. His general interests attend to the life course and life histories and how both are shaped by inequality, lived experiences, and relationships to social structures.

Colter Mitchell

Colter Mitchell

Co-investigator

About Colter

Colter Mitchell’s research utilizes a range of biological data types such as epigenetics, neuroimaging, and genetics to better understand how social conditions shape population health. In particular his work uses these biomarkers to elucidate pathways by which social inequalities cause health inequalities. This research uses longitudinal population-based studies where biological data are collected at multiple timepoints. His research also includes the development of new methods for integrating the collection and analysis of biological and social data.

Paul Mohai

Paul Mohai

Co-investigator

About Paul

Paul Mohai’s teaching and research interests are focused on environmental justice, public opinion and the environment, and influences on environmental policy making. He is a founder of the Environmental Justice Program at the University of Michigan and a major contributor to the growing body of quantitative research examining disproportionate environmental burdens and their impacts on low income and people of color communities. In 1990, he co-organized with Dr. Bunyan Bryant the “Michigan Conference on Race and the Incidence of Environmental Hazards”, which was credited by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as one of two events bringing the issue of Environmental Justice to the attention of the Agency. He is author or co-author of numerous articles, books, and reports focused on race and the environment, including “Environmental Racism: Reviewing the Evidence”, “Race and the Incidence of Environmental Hazards”, “Toxic Waste and Race at Twenty”, and “Which Came First, People or Pollution?”. His current research involves national level studies examining the causes of environmental disparities and the role environmental factors play in accounting for racial and socioeconomic disparities in health. Through a grant from the Kresge Foundation, he is also examining pollution burdens around public schools and the links between such burdens and student performance and health.

Haley Mullen

Haley Mullen

Graduate Student

About Haley

Haley Mullen is a second-year M.S. student in UM’s School for Environment and Sustainability, where she is pursuing a degree in Environmental Justice and Geospatial Data Sciences. Since joining the Landscapes Lab in April 2021, Haley has worked on creating geospatial measures of city- and neighborhood-level segregation for the HRS project and carried out geocoding for all waves of the ACL survey. Outside of her work with ISR, Haley is also involved as a Graduate Student Instructor for EAS531: Principles of GIS, and part of the leadership team for SEAS’ Decolonizing Initiative. She is also writing a thesis with Dr. Kyle Whyte on the inclusion of Indigenous peoples in environmental justice screening tools. Upon graduating in April 2022, Haley will be pursuing her PhD in Geographical Sciences with a focus in geographic information sciences.

Konstantinos Papaefthymiou

Konstantinos Papaefthymiou

Data Manager

About Konstantinos

Konstantinos Papaefthymiou joined Social Environment and Health as a data project manager, having worked as a data curator at ICPSR and a research affiliate at USC CREATE prior. He holds a Master’s in Public Policy from the University of Southern California and has contributed to research on topics including disaster resilience and environmental economics.

Devon Payne-Sturges

Devon Payne-Sturges

Co-investigator

About Devon

Devon Payne-Sturges is an Associate Professor with the Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health at the University of Maryland, School of Public Health. She also holds a joint appointment in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of Maryland, Payne-Sturges served as Assistant Commissioner for Environmental Health with the Baltimore City Health Department then later as the Assistant Center Director for Human Health with U.S. EPA’s National Center for Environmental Research where she focused on biomonitoring for policy analysis, cumulative risk assessment, health impact assessment, environmental health indicator development, children’s environmental health and environmental health of minority populations. She has worked with numerous stakeholders, including relevant state and federal agencies and NGOs in the fields of environmental and occupational health. Her research focuses on racial and economic disparities in exposures to environmental contaminants and associated health risks with the aim of improving the science our society uses to make decisions about environmental policies that impact the health of communities and populations, especially vulnerable, low income and minority populations. She is currently conducting research applying systems modeling to better understand the links between  structural racism and cumulative environmental exposures under a K01 award from NIEHS. Payne-Sturges earned her MPH and Doctor of Public Health degrees in environmental health sciences from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.  

Rich Puchalsky

Rich Puchalsky

Data Analyst

About Rich

Rich Puchalsky started working on public access to environmental data in 1991 with the RTK NET project for the nonprofit group OMB Watch. He has run his own business, Grassroots Connection, since 1997, working on a large number of projects involving environmental, demographic, and financial data for various nonprofit and academic entities. Among these projects was Fedspending.org, which the Obama administration later licensed as the first iteration of its USASpending.gov online database of federal contracts and grants. His prominent current projects are Subsidy Tracker, Violation Tracker, and Covid Stimulus Watch for the nonprofit group Good Jobs First and Toxic 100 and Greenhouse 100 for the Political Economy Research Institute at UMass.
Nicholas Prieur

Nicholas Prieur

Staff

About Nicholas

Nicholas Prieur is a Research Process Senior Manager in the Social Environment and Health Program, where he serves as SEHI’s overall research administrator. In his role he manages all pre-award research activities, financials, HR transactions, restricted project data contracts, IRB’s, and other program needs. He also leads the program’s shared administrative team, with specializations in post award, editing, publication production, social media, website maintenance and computing support. He received his BS from Michigan State University in 2002.
Sarah Sernaker

Sarah Sernaker

Data Analyst

About Sarah

Sarah Sernaker is a statistician who provides research support to Professor Chris Wildeman and for the National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect. She provides analyses and visualizations that have helped researchers study racial and socioeconomic disparities in child welfare outcomes and incarceration trends.
Kerby Shedden

Kerby Shedden

Co-investigator

About Kerby

Kerby Shedden received his PhD in Statistics from UCLA in 1999 and joined the University of Michigan the same year. His research interests include genomics, genetics, and other areas of life science where large and complex data arise. He also is interested in computational statistics and statistical software development. He participates in many collaborative research efforts including biomarker screening for cancer and kidney disease outcomes, cell-based screening for understanding the behavior of chemical probes in cells, and genetic association analysis for longitudinal traits.
Huaman Sun

Huaman Sun

Graduate Student

About Huaman

Huaman Sun is a graduate student at the University of Michigan, majoring in Survey and Data Science. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Sociology and Psychology from Renmin University of China. Her research interest includes how social environment shapes human and their behaviors, and quantitative methods.
Dominique Sylvers

Dominique Sylvers

Graduate Student

About Dominique

Dominique Sylvers is a doctoral student in the department of Health Behavior and Health Education (HBHE) at the School of Public Health. She received her Master’s of Public Health from HBHE in 2017, after which, she was involved with various aspects of chronic disease intervention research. As a pre-doctoral trainee at ISR, in both Social Environment and Health (SEH) and the Population Studies Center (PSC), her research centers around examining structural inequalities for their role in health and aging disparities for African Americans. More specifically, she’s studied the influence of the social environment via specific neighborhood and regional contexts and their relationship to differential outcomes in cognitive aging and dementia care-giving. Dominique’s dissertation work involves clarifying the role of segregation and educational inequality as contributing to disparities in biological aging using DNA Methylation.
Mary Wessel Walker

Mary Wessel Walker

Staff

About Mary

Mary Wessel Walker is a Project Coordinator supporting Dr. Margaret Hicken’s Landscapes of Structural Racism and Health projects. Mary studied philosophy and mathematics at Bryn Mawr College. In her spare time she enjoys teaching Scottish Country Dancing and sewing her own clothes.
Chris Wildeman

Chris Wildeman

Co-investigator

About Chris

Chris Wildeman is Professor of Sociology in the Trinity College of Arts & Sciences at Duke University, where he is also Director of the National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect (NDACAN), hosted by Cornell University and Duke University. Since 2019, he has also been Professor at the ROCKWOOL Foundation Research Unit in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Prior to joining Duke’s faculty in 2020, Wildeman was Professor of Policy Analysis and Management (PAM) and Sociology (by courtesy), Director of the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research (BCTR), and Associate Vice Provost for the Social Sciences at Cornell University. Prior to that, he was Associate Professor of Sociology at Yale University. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology and Demography from Princeton University in 2008 and his postdoctoral training from 2008 to 2010 as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar at the University of Michigan.